Charts – Set Anatomy

Posted On August 9, 2007

Unmasked-43

Charts are shot for each new roll of film and when the color temperature of the light changes (going from indoor tungsten lighting to outdoor daylight). This tells the lab when they transfer the film to video what 18% neutral gray is so the colors come out accurately.

Written by Joey Daoud

Joey Daoud is an award-winning documentary producer. When not filming he likes to climb mountains and brew coffee.

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2 Comments

  1. Frankly Mr Shankly

    I’ve always wondered if they calibrate the color going from film to digital… I see that the chart in the picture has both CMY and RGB sections. Are those industry-standard samples, so (combined with the grey-value info I guess) they can dial the colors in exactly, or do they just get the brightness correct and digitally grade everything else later?

    (Also, is duct-tape-covered pants an efficiency trick? Makes sense to have a bunch of pieces ready to go.)

  2. C47

    They actually just use the black, white, and gray area to time to. The colors don’t matter. We’ll color correct the film in post either in Final Cut or through Color.

    It’s actually Gaffer Tape on her pants and it does help to have some pre-torn pieces, especially when you’re on camera team so you can quickly give an actor marks.